Does overtraining affect more than just

Does overtraining affect more than just your body?

New research suggests that pushing our bodies too far can affect decision-making as well. After many weeks of overtraining, athletes in the study were likely to choose instant gratification instead of long-term success.

Is overtraining affecting your cognitive function?
Are you making more impulsive choices based on training fatigue?
Maybe it’s time to take a break.

Physical and mental fatigue often come hand in hand, so remember to take care of your body and mind.

http://ow.ly/96JF50wygXW

Planning to work out this weekend? We wa

Planning to work out this weekend?

We want to know how you measure a successful workout.

If you feel that physical activity requires a decent amount of sweat to be successful, think again.

Effectiveness does not always correlate with amount of sweat. Think about long runs in winter – they aren’t necessarily as sweaty as summer ones, so does that mean your workout wasn’t as fulfilling?

How about gym workouts? If your goal is to become stronger through weight lifting, sweat may not be a byproduct of that workout.

Judging workout effectiveness is a matter of results – not the amount of sweat on your t-shirt. Need help tracking your progress? Ask us for recommendations!

For more, read the Well + Good article here.

http://ow.ly/qxF550w98LH

Planning to work out this weekend? We wa

Planning to work out this weekend?

We want to know how you measure a successful workout.

If you feel that physical activity requires a decent amount of sweat to be successful, think again.

Effectiveness does not always correlate with amount of sweat. Think about long runs in winter – they aren’t necessarily as sweaty as summer ones, so does that mean your workout wasn’t as fulfilling?

How about gym workouts? If your goal is to become stronger through weight lifting, sweat may not be a byproduct of that workout.

Judging workout effectiveness is a matter of results – not the amount of sweat on your t-shirt. Need help tracking your progress? Ask us for recommendations!

For more, read the Well + Good article here.

http://ow.ly/qxF550w98LH

Today, we are asking the question on eve

Today, we are asking the question on everyone’s mind: how much time can I take off from exercise without losing all of the progress I’ve made?

For starters – taking time off is great for your body and mind from time to time. Don’t be afraid to take a little break and come back refreshed to your training schedule.

If you’re a 5-6 day a week athlete, general strength won’t deteriorate with a month’s rest, but sport-specific muscle fibers may change in two weeks.

Cardio-fanatic? You might lose conditioning faster than losing strength. After 4 weeks of inactivity, VO2 max (which measures the maximum capacity to transport and use oxygen during exercise) decreases about 20%. In one study, after 12 days, blood enzymes associated with endurance performance fell by 50%! But don’t worry – this type of conditioning can be quickly regained.

For the rest of us, strength loss generally happens within the 2.5 to 3 week range.

Want to learn more? Read the full article here.

http://ow.ly/fCBm50vEBDq

Diet, activity and rest: the recipe for

Diet, activity and rest: the recipe for a healthy heart?

A native tribe in the Amazon, the Tsimane, are said to have the healthiest hearts in the world. One doctor’s study of the Tsimane people resulted in an enriching study on achieving excellent heart health.

Instead of the anticipated “paleo” type diet, the study found that the Tsimane people eat most of their calories in the form of carbohydrates – plantains, cassava, rice, and corn account for 70% of their diet.

What’s missing from their diet? Added sugars and salts. The other important factors were 15% fat, 15% protein, and nearly twice as much fiber as the typical American diet. Intermittent fasting, as a result of food scarcity, was also a notable aspect of their diet.

In the realm of activity, the Tsimane people spend most of their time either standing or walking; on average, they take about 17,000 steps per day. Contrary to the intense workouts that have become popular recently (from HIIT to resistance training), the Tsimane fitness regime consists of constant (but not intense) activity.

The third key to heart health is rest. Without electronics and having a schedule based on daylight, the Tsimane people spent a large amount of time resting and sleeping (about 9 hours per day).

Other heart healthy aspects of their culture? Socialization, which we know to be helpful in the fight against heart health and premature death in general.

Feel free to read more about these interesting discoveries below.

http://ow.ly/iQLz50vpZEv